You can now use Steam Link nearly anywhere

You can now use Steam Link nearly anywhere

Less glamorous than cross-network gameplay, the boring-sounding news about the addition of new APIs to the Steamworks SDK is actually quite notable: The extensions give developers access to Steam's network backbone and packet management skills - honed via its DOTA 2 and Counterstrike: Global Offensive experience - for multiplayer games. You could only stream games on your local network at home.

Available now in beta form, there are a few caveats to note before forging ahead and trying the service.

Game streaming is becoming more and more popular as time goes on. To jump in on the mobile action Steam have announced their Steam Link Anywhere and have a supporting Android app ready.




Ensure you are on the latest version of the Steam Link Android app by visiting its page at the Google Play Store. You'll be given a pairing code which you'll need to use to connect with your Steam library on the host PC.

Update: Dec. 20, 2018 - Valve is no longer selling the Steam Link hardware, but it will continue to update and support the Steam Link app going forward. Part of this is better development tools, but more importantly, Valve are letting developers route network traffic through Steam's own infrastructure now. You should be able to pick a game and then stream it to your Android device as if you were on the same network as your host PC. That's because Apple has already rejected Steams attempts to get the Steam Link app into the App Store, saying that it represents "business conflicts" presumably because Apple is anxious about people playing PC games rather than those from the App Store. Valve explain the system here, and among the perks for developers are anonymized network traffic (protecting servers and clients from DDOS attacks) and potentially lower pings through Valve's networks.

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