OR governor urges vaccines as measles cases grow to 55

OR governor urges vaccines as measles cases grow to 55

The World Health Organization said on Thursday Europe had a record number of measles cases in 2018, in part due to a growing number of pockets where parents are refusing vaccination for their children.

Vaccination rates for measles, mumps and rubella in Ukraine fell sharply over a number of years during its conflict with Russian Federation, reaching 31% in 2016 - among the lowest in the world.

Europe is not the only country impacted by a spike in measles cases.

Dr. Alan Melnick, Public Health Director and Clark County Health Officer, said that two major factors are causing the outbreak.

The Northwest cases are among three ongoing measles outbreaks in the USA that sickened 79 people in January, according to the CDC.

According to newly released data for the year, 82,596 people were infected and 72 people (children and adults) died from measles last year.

The case prompted NSW Health to urge people travelling to South East Asia to ensure they are fully vaccinated before heading overseas. The vaccines include MMR, which protects against measles, mumps and rubella, and MMR-V, which also protects against the varicella-zoster virus, which causes chickenpox. Since October, the African island nation has seen more than 50,000 cases of the highly contagious viral infection, which has so far taken the lives of more than 300 people, mostly kids, the country's secretary general of the ministry of health tells CNN.




Vaccination coverage needs to be about 95 per cent to prevent the virus circulating in communities to create what is known as "herd immunity".

But he's hearing from doctors and pediatricians that people are coming in to be vaccinated - including children whose parents, up to now, have been hesitant.

The total number of infections last year is 15 times higher than the record low just two years ago, and three times higher than the total reported in 2017.

Ninety-two percent of the cases were reported by 10 countries: Ukraine (53,218), Serbia (5,076), Israel (2,919), France (2,913), Italy (2,517), Russian Federation (2,256), Georgia (2,203), Greece (2,193), Albania (1,466) and Romania (1,987).

"The picture for 2018 makes it clear that the current pace of progress in raising immunisation rates will be insufficient to stop measles circulation". Yet one or two out of every 1,000 children who get measles will die from complications, according to the CDC.

Heidi Larson, a specialist in vaccines and public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said the increase in cases was a "wake-up call" on the importance of building confidence in vaccination.

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