Alternative Fact of the Week: Patrolling El Paso's criminal hellscape

Alternative Fact of the Week: Patrolling El Paso's criminal hellscape

But he added: "We need border security".

President Donald Trump appears to be taking a more positive view of Capitol Hill talks on border security, according to negotiators who struck a distinctly optimistic tone after a White House meeting with Republicans on the broad parameters of a potential bipartisan agreement.

After negotiators on Wednesday left a private briefing from federal border patrol and customs officials, No. 2 Senate Democratic leader, Richard Durbin, said lawmakers were told the top priority was technology.

As President Donald Trump prepares for his first campaign rally of 2019 in El Paso, Texas, former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke slammed Trump's ongoing use of his hometown as an example of a successful border wall.

Trump's appeals for bipartisanship in his State of the Union address clashed with the rancorous atmosphere he has helped cultivate in the nation's capital - as well as the desire of most Democrats to block his agenda during his next two years in office.

Rep. Veronica Escobar (D-TX), who represents El Paso, disagreed with the president.

Trump, during his 90-minute speech, claimed that El Paso went from being one of the most risky cities in the United States to being one of the safest. If Mr. Trump wants to force Congress to spend another $5.7 billion on anything, why not push a few billion our way and create 21st century jobs, or a modern public transit system that serves jobless neighborhoods, or transform Baltimore public schools into the envy of Maryland? And an indignant Wiles responded that in fact, the West Texas city has always been known for its lower crime rates.




There's a February 15 deadline to enact the measure or a stopgap spending bill to avert another partial government shutdown, which neither side wants to reprise.

In Tuesday's State of the Union address, Trump cited El Paso as once having "extremely high rates of violent crime".

"If I had not been elected president of the United States, we would right now, in my opinion, be in a major war with North Korea", he said. "I feel okay here inside, because I don't know anybody on the outside, anyway".

"He will be joining our protest outside of Trump's rally at the El Paso County Coliseum", the page's organizer, Laura Valdez, wrote.

While Trump touted a decrease in crime in El Paso since the fence was constructed in 2006 and 2008. The same survey points to 6,095 in Baltimore in 2017 - keeping in mind that Charm City has about 72,000 fewer residents than El Paso.

El Paso's crime rate fell between 1993 and 2006 by more than 34 percent - but it wasn't because of a wall. Shelby said Trump was "very reasonable".

Miguel Riquelme, the Governor of Coahuila, a Mexican state near the U.S. border, told local newspapers that he will not allow more migrants to travel through the area.

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