Democrat Kyrsten Sinema wins Arizona US Senate Seat

Democrat Kyrsten Sinema wins Arizona US Senate Seat

"Arizona rejected what has been far too common in our country - name calling, petty, personal attacks and doing and saying what it takes to get elected", Sinema said as scores of backers waved her purple-and-yellow campaign sign. She cited the example of John McCain, who died in August. Democrat Sandra Kennedy also maintains a 10,000-vote lead over Republican Justin Olson, her closest competitor in the race for Arizona Corporation Commission.

McSally posted a video message to twitter.

Supporters are also cheering, upon hearing news of Sinema's victory.

Flake, who decided not to run for re-election, leaves office in January.

The race between Sinema and McSally was one of the most closely watched in the nation.

"I think it's over", said Chuck Coughlin, a veteran Republican strategist in the state, crediting Democrats' turnout operation, particularly among early voters.

Despite its image as a staunch Republican bastion, Arizona is attracting younger, educated voters from elsewhere in the United States.

Though Sinema wooed moderates, she needed liberals like Morrison in her corner for her win.




Almost a week after Election Day, the Associated Press projected Sinema as the victor on Monday.

Sinema said the former prisoner of war and GOP presidential nominee was "irreplaceable" and "taught us to assume the best in others, to seek compromise instead of sewing division, & to always put country ahead of party".

Sinema is an openly bisexual former Green Party activist who remade herself into a centrist.

The 42-year-old was elected as a Democrat to the state legislature in 2004 and carved out a reputation as a liberal who could work with her conservative colleagues.

In 2012, Baldwin made history by becoming the first openly gay person elected to Senate, in addition to being the first woman elected to represent Wisconsin in Congress.

Secondly, while the National Republican Senatorial Committee's conduct in casting doubt on the vote-counting process was reprehensible, Ducey, Cindy McCain and Republican candidate Martha McSally behaved appropriately, refusing to join in the anti-democratic process of delegitimising elections that don't go their way.

She also underscored the fact that she had not voted for Nancy Pelosi for House Speaker.

GOP leadership elections are set for Wednesday, with new members making their way to Capitol Hill this week in both the House and Senate, as Scott will be allowed to participate in the Senate Republican elections, even though his race remains in flux, while elections officials in 67 counties were going through ballots for a Senate recount. Gabby Giffords after she was wounded in a 2011 assassination attempt. He strongly backed last year's tax cut bill but criticized Trump's positions on free trade.

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