SpaceX signs up mystery passenger for first trip around moon

SpaceX signs up mystery passenger for first trip around moon

"SpaceX has signed the world's first private passenger to fly around the Moon aboard our BFR launch vehicle - an important step toward enabling access for everyday people who dream of travelling to space".

SpaceX, the private space exploration company that tests its rocket motors at its facility in McGregor west of Waco, has signed up a traveler for a flight to the moon.

Who will be flying and why will be known on Monday, September 17 at 6 pm PT, added in the tweet.

The webcast is embedded below.

The BFR is bigger than the Falcon Heavy and has its own dedicated area for crew.

The company said more details would be made available on Monday.




But Musk later hinted that the passenger could be Japanese by tweeting the country's flag when asked if he was the one being sent. Plans for that flight were eventually delayed; it's unclear if one of the two passengers from that flight will be taking the trip on the BFR.

In a recent question-and-answer session held in Madrid, SpaceX president and chief operating officer Gwynne Shotwell said the company is targeting initial tests on the vehicle in late 2019 and launches as early as 2021.

The 35-story BFR will be powered by 31 of SpaceX's next-generation Raptor engines, with a rocket and spacecraft component - the Big Falcon Spaceship, or BFS.

"We've been approached to do a crewed mission beyond the moon from some private individuals", he said at the time.

During a speech in Australia previous year, Musk said he was hopeful that the BFR would be able to launch and land at last two cargo ships on Mars by 2022.

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