Perseids Meteor Shower Will Be One Of Year’s Best Sky Shows

Perseids Meteor Shower Will Be One Of Year’s Best Sky Shows

While you can see the glowing pieces from July 14 through August 24, the peak is only over a few nights, from August 11th to the 13th. What's more, the illuminating display is one of year's brightest, too.

Every August there is an opportunity to see meteor showers and this weekend is your chance for 2018.

What is the Perseid Meteor Shower?

While this weekend is the peak, Twarog predicts the showers will last through August 24.

And while they take his name, the meteors don't actually come from the stars in the Perseus constellation, which are hundreds of light-years away.

If you want to catch a glimpse of the Perseid meteor shower, then it's worth finding a dark location; light pollution will inhibit your view of the meteor shower. However, this year with a dark clear sky, it's possible to see an fantastic light show. The comet Swift-Tuttle orbits the sun once every 133 years, so every August, the Earth passes through the comet's debris field.




The best time to see the most meteors according to the American Meteor Society tends to be just before dawn, around 4 a.m. local time.

Although the shower peaks on August 12, you'll be able to see a good deal of shooting stars all weekend and into Monday.

But the most spectacular long-lasting meteors, known as "Earthgrazers", can be seen when the radiant is still low above the horizon.

"Relax, be patient, and let your eyes adapt to the darkness", Kelly Beatty, Sky & Telescope senior editor said in a statement. If you're serious about your stargazing, allow ample time for this beforehand.

Active Junky, which is also the sister site of Space.com, has provided a list of the nation's top cities, and the best places they can go to watch the meteor show.

While stars and star clusters are Twarog's specialty, he said he appreciates how the meteor showers light up the summer sky and anyone can appreciate the celestial wonder. However, with a little planning and some patience, you can get some truly memorable images. "These meteors will strike the atmosphere at around 60 kilometres per second and cause long streaks which completely vapourize".

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